Strong Housing.

10.10.2018Thanks to the unemployment rate falling to the lowest level in nearly 50 years and home prices continuing to rise but at a slower pace, when it comes to loan performance, housing is very strong. In every category of CoreLogic’s Loan Performance Insights report for July, rates dropped. Seriously delinquent loans in foreclosure were the lone sailor remaining stable. Even better: with the unemployment rate remaining below 4 percent since July, we are hopeful to see delinquency rates continue to drop in the future. However, natural disasters and any unemployment rises could impact delinquency rates at a local level not a national level.

A record of 77 percent of homeowners believe now is a good time to sell. It might be a seller’s market for most locations but for some millennials, homes aren’t selling fast enough, leaving the generation “the most likely to make concessions, change the date of their closing, and have an offer fall through.” If you didn’t catch our latest Live on Real Estate podcast, we’re talking about this sudden cool off compared to traffic we saw four months ago.

Mortgage rates have hit the 5 percent level but this isn’t terrible news. With home prices cooling off slightly and the historical average between 8 to 9 percent, those 5s are still looking good for homebuyers, especially in a market that is thriving with little percent down.

The dreaded lack of inventory has seen some slight relief, with September’s new listings up 8 percent year over year according to Realtor.com’s housing report. This is the highest annual jump since 2013. Unfortunately, this was driven by condos and townhomes.

A hundred years ago, kit homes allowed many Americans to become homeowners and now, they might be making a comeback. Fortunately, this time, we’re talking rooms and additions; you don’t need to buy the whole house. Unfortunately, with today’s regulations, depending on the kit a contractor or expert might need to be hired to assemble the kit.

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